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Can Gluten make autoimmune conditions worse?

Table of Contents:

  • Gluten-free
  • Proteins
  • Autoimmune

Can Gluten make autoimmune conditions worse?

Non-celiac gluten sensitivity is slowly gaining momentum as a legitimate health concern at par with celiac disease. At first, the research findings point out how substances seen in food products containing gluten contribute to those without celiac disease in developing fatigue and bloating. But now with the recent developments in research, it may be much more serious than we first thought.

In a research report presented at the recently concluded United European Gastroenterology Week in Vienna, researchers were able to show that certain proteins found in wheat can activate inflammation in the body which possibly triggers the development of asthma, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis. These proteins, called Amylase Trypsin Inhibitors, are naturally occurring enzymes that prevent parasites from destroying wheat. Unfortunately, it triggers an inflammation cascade that directly affects multiple organs in the body and thus exacerbating the previously mentioned diseases.

The findings of this study further strengthen the already numerous studies pointing out the benefits of a wheat-free diet.  With further studies, the role of wheat-free diet may soon expand to that of other autoimmune conditions beyond celiac disease.

Over 13,300 delegates, presenters, faculty and industry partners made UEG Week Vienna 2016 another successful meeting.

https://live.ueg.eu/week/

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Can a gluten free diet help those with Irritable Bowel Syndrome?

Table of Contents:

  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome
  • Gluten-free
  • Celiac

Can a gluten free diet help those with Irritable Bowel Syndrome?

The anecdotal health benefits of a gluten-free diet have long been touted by those who believe that staying away from gluten is the key to a healthy life. Despite the prevailing medical opinion that going gluten-free only benefits those with a condition called celiac disease, a number of studies are surprisingly supportive of the contrary.

In a recent study published in the International Journal of Colorectal Diseases, researchers sought to find whether certain individuals with gastrointestinal problems could benefit from avoiding gluten in the absence of a celiac disease diagnosis.

In the study spanning a 1 year period of gluten abstinence covering 35 participants with Irritable Bowel Syndrome, it was shown that 34 percent were, in fact, sensitive to the presence of wheat in the diet and benefited from eliminating gluten from their diet.

This small scale but long term study further supports the belief that other medical conditions can reap the benefits of a gluten-free lifestyle as long as strict adherence is followed.

Long-term response to gluten-free diet as evidence for non-celiac wheat sensitivity in one third of patients with diarrhea-dominant and mixed-type irritable bowel syndrome.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/27695975/